Banner graphic showing the 2017 Go Magazine Readers' Choice Award for Best Museum Exhibition
Past St. Louis Cardinals baseball players
Advertisement for MHM's "#1 in Civil Rights" exhibit
Images of rain in St. Louis
25, May 2017

Supporting Civil Rights for All

Not long ago, the Holocaust Museum & Learning Center and the St. Louis Jewish Community Archives developed an exhibition called Standing for Justice. The first part (1930–1950) focused on anti-Semitism and discrimination against the St. Louis Jewish community in everything from housing and employment to swimming-pool access and the Red Scare. Material for the follow-up exhibition (1950–1980) revealed a gradual change in focus in the post-WWII-era Jewish community, one that strongly involved fighting for the civil rights of all people. Read more »

23, May 2017

How James B. Eads Conquered the Mighty Mississippi

The Mississippi River has beckoned millions of people to settle up and down its fertile banks, inspiring countless creative works. It has been personified in song, and its ever-changing nature has been used as a metaphor for life itself. But James Buchanan Eads didn’t find inspiration on the Mississippi’s surface—he found it below. Read more »

21, May 2017

Does the World Still Care about Charles Lindbergh?

On May 21, 1927, airmail pilot Charles Lindbergh became the first person to fly nonstop across the Atlantic Ocean. As he navigated the Spirit of St. Louis from New York to Paris, the world watched closely. When the plane touched down at Le Bourget Airport in Paris, a jubilant crowd greeted the aviator and created shockwaves of excitement that could be felt around the globe. Newspaper headlines lauded Lindbergh’s feat, throngs of people followed his every move, and various heads of state and dignitaries awarded him with medals of honor and extraordinary gifts. Read more »

17, May 2017

It Sure Is Good, Guys and Gals!

If you’re from this area or have lived here for some time, those words—the tagline for Ted Drewes Frozen Custard—instantly conjure thoughts of summer and the quintessential St. Louis frozen treat: a concrete you can turn upside down without spilling a drop. Read more »

16, May 2017

The First Police Rogues' Gallery in America

Would you believe that photography became a crime-fighting tool fairly early in its existence, at a time when some viewed the technology as utterly unbelievable and others had never even heard of it? What if someone told you that this law-enforcement innovation developed right here in St. Louis? Read more »

12, May 2017

St. Louis's Baseball-Loving Valkyrie

One of America’s greatest Wagnerian sopranos first graced the stage of New York’s Metropolitan Opera House on May 12, 1937, in a new opera by Walter Damrosch. She had this to say of the experience: Read more »

8, May 2017

MHM Wins National Award for Diversity and Accessibility

Today we at the Missouri History Museum were honored to take the stage with our colleagues at The Field Museum in Chicago to accept the American Alliance of Museums’s (AAM) inaugural Award for Diversity, Equity, Accessibility, and Inclusion. Although we certainly don’t do our work with awards in mind, this one is pretty special. Read more »

3, May 2017

Deeds of Mistrust

Across the first half of the 20th century, realtors and white homeowners used restrictive deed covenants to stem African Americans' “invasion” of American cities. Such covenants bound those who signed them, as well as subsequent owners, to limit whom a property could be sold to and who could live there. Read more »

30, April 2017

How Did Route 66 Get Its Number?

The black-and-white Route 66 shield is an internationally recognized symbol of America, on par with the Golden Gate Bridge, Gateway Arch, and Statue of Liberty. The road itself is a 2,400-mile icon of America’s collective memory. Even for those of us who weren’t around to drive it during its heyday, the number 66 is mythical. But what if that number had been different, like 60, 62, or even 60N? Read more »

27, April 2017

Have You Met an ACTivist Yet?

Whether introducing new generations to St. Louis's civil rights legacy or reminding older ones of its existence, the ACTivists Project ensures the people and stories of our community's freedom struggle will not be forgotten. This theatre-based project is a counterpart to our #1 in Civil Rights exhibit. Read more »