Advertisement for MHM's "#1 in Civil Rights" exhibit
22, November 2017

When Innovations of the 1930s Came to Town

Who hasn’t thought “there has to be a better way to do this” or “if only such a thing existed”? Well, the exhibitors at the National Inventors’ Congress went beyond these idle musings to turn their daydreams into inventions! Read more »

17, November 2017

St. Louis's "Billionaire" Businessman

John O’Fallon barely knew his father, James, but the lingering tales of him as a “reckless, debt-ridden adventurer” undoubtedly contributed to John’s lifelong obsession with business success. Read more »

15, November 2017

Of Primary (Source) Importance

Distilling 200+ years of civil rights history into a 76-page book provides an immediate recipe for writer’s agony—and that’s before the wrinkle of crafting text for an upper elementary school audience. Yet that’s the task Dr. Read more »

13, November 2017

Scoring an NHL First in St. Louis

Long before the St. Louis Blues took to the ice at the Arena, another National Hockey League team called St. Louis home—and scored an important first in NHL history. Read more »

11, November 2017

WWI Victory Celebrations and Homecomings

World War I ended on November 11, 1918, with the declaration of an armistice. The four-year fight claimed millions of lives and displaced millions more. The United States played a brief yet pivotal role in the war, spearheading the Meuse-Argonne Offensive that forced Germany’s surrender. Read more »

9, November 2017

A Chimney Topper's Tale

On February 16, 1959, the first buildings started to fall in St. Louis’s historic Mill Creek Valley neighborhood. Their demolition had been years in the making: In 1954, Mayor Raymond Tucker proposed a plan to raze the more than 400 square acres of city that stood between Saint Louis University and Union Station as part of St. Louis’s post–World War II revitalization. Read more »

7, November 2017

Elijah Lovejoy: An American Martyr

“Elijah Parish Lovejoy died in Alton, Illinois, on November 7, 1837. He died, so far as is known, as the only martyr in the United States of America to the cause of the Freedom of the Press.” So reads the legal motion to close the case of Lovejoy’s estate, 100 years after his death sparked new passion in the abolitionist movement. Read more »

1, November 2017

What Survivors Had to Say

In 1855 the Pacific Railroad was completed from St. Louis to Jefferson City, an achievement four years in the making. To celebrate the railroad’s progress, 600 special guests were invited to take a train ride to the Missouri capital. On November 1, 1855, St. Louis officials and dignitaries boarded train cars and settled in for the journey, confident of their safe arrival despite stormy weather. Read more »

31, October 2017

Spirits in St. Louis

“The Misses Fox, the original and genuine Spirit Rappers, or Rochester Knockers are in St. Louis.” That was the headline in Glasgow, Missouri, in June 1852. Obviously eager to witness the phenomenon firsthand, the editor of the town’s Weekly Times newspaper finished the notice with a plea: “Send them up this way, gentlemen of the press.”

The “Misses Fox” to whom the article referred were sisters Kate and Maggie Fox, the unlikely founders of an obsession that swept the nation in the 1850s. Read more »

27, October 2017

The Premiere of Our EDPremier Project

We have some pretty exciting news to share: Through the generosity of the Institute of Museum and Library Services, we recently secured funding to fully process the film portion of our Epsilon-Dalzell Premier Collection. This means that for the next three years, we’ll be cleaning, repairing, and preserving thousands of rolls of film created by a company that played a major role in St. Louis’s advertising heyday. Read more »