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12, November 2013

A Permanent Home for the Symphony in 1968

While our nation was captivated by the latest hits of the most popular rock n’ roll artists in 1968—the Beatles, Simon and Garfunkel, and the Doors, to name a few—St. Louisans were delighted by an additional genre of music that year: classical. The Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra, which had already engaged audiences for more than 85 years, found its first permanent home at the Powell Symphony Hall. Read more »

1, November 2013

Visitors to Experience Utopia at Museum Next Year

At the Missouri History Museum, we often host traveling exhibits from across the country. Right now, for example, we are hosting exhibits from Monticello and Minnesota. Rarely, however, do we feature exhibits that will take as long of a trip as one that will be coming to us next year. Read more »

28, October 2013

African American Pioneers in 1968: Margaret Bush Wilson

The 1968 Exhibit sheds light on the national landscape of American culture, politics, movements, music, and more of that tumultuous year. While preparing for the exhibit's opening, Community Education & Events intern Domonique Taylor studied the content in search of ways to showcase St. Louis’s own contributions to the era. She focused her attention on four accomplished African American St. Louis women. These women embody the characteristics of the time period in their fights for equality and success in male-dominated fields. Read more »

25, October 2013

Hometown Hockey Team Links to 1968

Many events occurred in and around 1968, from the controversial Vietnam War and the assassinations of Dr. Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy, to the election of Richard Nixon and the successful Apollo 8 mission. On one hand, popular culture and music echoed the opinions of this fractured society by staging anti-war demonstrations and producing memorable albums like Jimi Hendrix’s Electric Ladyland and the Beatles' "White Album." On the other hand, consumerism boomed during the largest period of economic expansion in U.S. Read more »

17, October 2013

Vietnam Veterans Give Huey Helicopter a Lift for The 1968 Exhibit

When you come to visit The 1968 Exhibit (now through January 5) at the Missouri History Museum, one of the first things you’ll encounter is a “Huey” helicopter that was flown in Vietnam. Although it logged many hours in the air, the helicopter arrives via crate these days and has to be assembled at each museum it visits as part of the traveling exhibit. Read more »

16, October 2013

African American Pioneers in 1968: Frankie Muse Freeman

The 1968 Exhibit sheds light on the national landscape of American culture, politics, movements, music, and more of that tumultuous year. While preparing for the exhibit's opening, Community Education & Events intern Domonique Taylor studied the content in search of ways to showcase St. Louis’s own contributions to the era. She focused her attention on four accomplished African American St. Louis women. These women embody the characteristics of the time period in their fights for equality and success in male-dominated fields. Read more »

7, October 2013

African American Pioneers in 1968: Josephine Baker

Josephine Baker is famous for being the first black woman to become an international star, but I think her story shows something deeper. Baker was a black woman who took control of her own destiny. Josephine Baker was born June 3, 1906, in St. Louis's Mill Creek Valley neighborhood, near Union Station. Her mother was a domestic worker, and by age eight, young Josephine began working in several houses, also as a domestic worker. Her wages helped to support her family, which consisted of her mother, stepfather, and three younger siblings. Read more »

7, August 2013

Teaching About Slavery: Cohort for K–12 Educators

One of our missions at the Museum is to create meaningful professional development opportunities for teachers. As we learned more how to talk with children about the history of enslavement in America, we realized that these conversations were almost everyday occurrences at the Museum, but might occur only once or twice a year in the school curriculum. This meant that we had ample opportunities to refine our approaches, and would have something to offer our school community. Read more »

31, July 2013

Teaching About Slavery: Spotswood Rice Letters

In a museum context, school groups are like the tide: They wash in, stay with us, and then wash back out into the community. We have to trust that we are planting a seed that we will never have the joy of seeing grow. But we can do everything in our power to make sure the seed will eventually flower. We only have one hour to plant this seed, but the good news is that, sometimes that it all it takes. Read more »

17, July 2013

Teaching About Slavery: So Many Ways to Be Strong

In a previous Teaching About Slavery post, we shared our approach to engaging elementary school students around the Freedom’s Memorial statue in The Civil War in Missouri exhibit. Having started with an exploration of the received memory of enslavement, our second stop on that gallery tour was to look at that history as the record shows it then. Read more »