Archives

26, May 2015

Who Was Camille Dry, Anyway?

Anyone studying Pictorial St. Louis, the enormous map that is a main feature of A Walk in 1875 St. Louis, will agree that producing something so exact and detailed surely took the skills of a master cartographer. Unfortunately, little is known of Camille N. Dry—or “Drie” as many of his maps before Pictorial St. Louis display his name.  Oddly, for a man whose profession involved extensive amounts of paper, we have little of his behind-the-scenes legacy left. Read more »

19, May 2015

From the Library: Black Misery by Langston Hughes

Black Misery, written by Langston Hughes and illustrated by Arouni, may not be a new book to many, but it was new to me recently when it came to my desk to be processed and moved into the Museum's library collection. Hughes finished the captions for the book in 1967, making it the last book he worked on before his death that same year. Black Misery is classified as a children’s or juvenile book, but once you read the 60-page book it becomes apparent that it is intended for a larger audience. Read more »

15, May 2015

WWI Artifacts and Memories: An Artist Overseas

Often when learning about World War I the focus is on the men in the trenches. Visions of going “over the top” and charging headlong into no man’s land and certain doom are evoked. Though this was a common experience for many of soldiers who served during the First World War, it was far from the only experience. Read more »

7, May 2015

World War I Artifacts and Memories: Sinking of the Lusitania

May 7, 2015, marks 100 years since the sinking of the RMS Lusitania by German submarine U-20. A British passenger ship on its way from New York to Liverpool, England, the Lusitania was running a risk traveling through waters that were at the time declared a war zone by Germany. The sinking of the Lusitania was a watershed moment in the conflict, serving as a galvanizing force in the United States that eventually led to their declaration of war against Germany less than a year later. Read more »

1, May 2015

Why 1875?

The origins of A Walk in 1875 began with a simple question: What if we brought Missouri History Museum visitors so much information about life in a single year of St. Louis history that they could imagine they were actually there? The idea was exciting no matter what year we chose, but settling on just one seemed nearly impossible! St. Louis has no shortage of big years in its past, all with different and exciting ways to bring them to life. However, one stood above all the rest.

So… why 1875? Read more »