Archives

30, April 2017

How Did Route 66 Get Its Number?

The black-and-white Route 66 shield is an internationally recognized symbol of America, on par with the Golden Gate Bridge, Gateway Arch, and Statue of Liberty. The road itself is a 2,400-mile icon of America’s collective memory. Even for those of us who weren’t around to drive it during its heyday, the number 66 is mythical. But what if that number had been different, like 60, 62, or even 60N? Read more »

28, April 2017

The First Police Rogues' Gallery in America

Would you believe that photography became a crime-fighting tool fairly early in its existence, at a time when some viewed the technology as utterly unbelievable and others had never even heard of it? What if someone told you that this law-enforcement innovation developed right here in St. Louis? Read more »

27, April 2017

Have You Met an ACTivist Yet?

Whether introducing new generations to St. Louis's civil rights legacy or reminding older ones of its existence, the ACTivists Project ensures the people and stories of our community's freedom struggle will not be forgotten. This theatre-based project is a counterpart to our #1 in Civil Rights exhibit. Read more »

25, April 2017

How the Spanish-American War Met the Society Pages

It’s probably been a while since a St. Louis Post-Dispatch editor has penned several hundred exasperated words about the tango.

 
21, April 2017

Isaac Sievers: The Man Who'd Photograph Anything

Isaac Sievers—Sievers Studio founder and the man behind many of the photographs featured in our Picturing 1930s St. Louis project—was the son of a German immigrant and an Arkansas native. The 1910 census, which lists him working as a salesman in the “picture line” industry in his hometown of Greenville, Mississippi, reveals that he’d already been bitten by the photography bug at just 24 years old. Read more »

19, April 2017

Curator Faves: Clothing Edition

The Missouri History Museum has a wonderful clothing and textile collection, and I've had the honor of being responsible for it for almost 17 years. Because the collection is made of up more than 18,000 pieces, it’s hard to know every single thing within it, but by working on exhibits, writing articles, giving tours, and meeting with researchers, I learn more every day. To me the collection is like a treasure trove of two of my favorite things: history and fashion. I find something I’ve never seen before almost every time I go into storage, which keeps my job interesting. Read more »

13, April 2017

Jordan Chambers: The Negro Mayor of St. Louis

In 1931 the St. Louis Post-Dispatch referred to Jordan Chambers, who held no official political office, as the Negro Mayor of St. Louis. Chambers was larger than life, a political power broker whose influence was far reaching. It was said that little happened in St. Louis politics—or in the black community in general—that Chambers didn’t somehow have a hand in. Read more »

10, April 2017

66 Through St. Louis: Crestwood Bowl

This is the seventh in a series of posts highlighting Route 66 stops of interest through St. Louis. We encourage you to learn more about their history and then check them out in person. Even better, snap some photos and share them with us on Twitter and Instagram by using #ShowMe66 and tagging @mohistorymuseum.  Read more »