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16, September 2016

St. Louis Is Full of Hot Air

St. Louisans' love for events such as the Great Forest Park Balloon Race is nothing new! Did you know St. Louis once boasted its own balloon manufacturers, hosted international balloon races, and served as a center for learning and innovation in lighter-than-air travel during the 1904 World's Fair?

To get your fill of hot air with some historic images from our collection, just click through the gallery below! Read more »

29, June 2016

Flipping the Switch on the Chase Hotel Sign

The past hundred years have been exciting ones for St. Louis, and the landmark Chase Hotel has been there for almost every one of them. The 9-story, 500-room Chase was built in 1922 by St. Louis businessman Chase Ulman at the corner of Lindell and Kingshighway, right along Route 66 (although the alignment of the Mother Road changed over time). Seven years later, Sam Koplar built the majestic 28-story Park Plaza Hotel next to the Chase, and the two hotels merged in 1947. Read more »

27, June 2016

Happy Birthday, History Clubhouse!

Today marks exactly one year since we opened our History Clubhouse, a nearly 6,000-square-foot space designed for children and families to explore and play. We built this space with the goal of bringing St. Louis history to local families in a much deeper way than we have in the past. Opening this space was a big deal—it was something we’d never done before, and something few history museums have done on such a big scale. Read more »

27, May 2016

Looking Back: The Great Cyclone of 1896

Shortly after 5pm on Wednesday, May 27, 1896, one of the largest tornadoes in American history swept through St. Louis, wreaking havoc on the city and neighboring East St. Louis. More than 250 people were killed in just 20 minutes. This tragic incident remains one of the most costly and devastating natural disasters in American history. Click through the gallery below to relive the aftermath of that fateful day through images from our collection.  Read more »

19, May 2016

Craft Beer: Nothing New for the Lou!

Last year, in a pair of posts written for my personal blog (Distilled History), I detailed a crazy plan of mine to identify every single Read more »

6, May 2016

5 Boss Moms of Missouri History

Missouri history boasts several boss women—women who were confident, intelligent, and could hold their own. In honor of Mother's Day, we're kicking off our recognition of the boss women of Missouri history by highlighting five boss moms. Here's to all you mothers out there—you're in excellent company!   Read more »

29, April 2016

Eye on Exhibits: Right Now

Right now is a great time to come to the Missouri History Museum, not just because you can see great exhibits and programs, but because now is a time when you can see first-hand much of the philosophy that drives our approach to sharing history. Read more »

15, March 2016

Eye on Exhibits: History Comes in Many Styles

“Why is this history?”

We expect to hear different versions of that question over the next few months after we open our latest exhibit. Read more »

8, March 2016

7 Eye-Opening Old Timey Cures

Advertisements for patent medicines, also known as home remedies or nostrums, were a staple of newspapers in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The popularity of nostrums was in large part due to the limitations of 19th-century medical care. Read more »

2, February 2016

Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America

Today, it seems like we can’t go to any of our favorite news sites without seeing at least one story about terrorism and sabotage. The threat of terrorism is a part of every news cycle, a part of the conversations that Americans from New York to Los Angeles are having with their family and friends. All this talk of terrorism and internal threats makes it seem like we’ve entered a new era in American history. In some ways this isn’t wrong. The word "terrorism" is fairly new; it wasn’t used widely until the 1970s although it was originally coined during the French Revolution in the 1790s. Read more »