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28, November 2017

5 Wacky Panoramas Details Hiding in Plain Sight

Thanks to their large widths, historic panoramic photos are able to cram lots of details into one space—often they aren’t even things the photographers meant to capture! They’re small snippets that live in the margins, details that, in the case of our Panoramas of the City exhibit, reveal the everyday lives of the people who called St. Louis home in the first half of the 20th century. Read more »

21, April 2017

Isaac Sievers: The Man Who'd Photograph Anything

Isaac Sievers—Sievers Studio founder and the man behind many of the photographs featured in our Picturing 1930s St. Louis project—was the son of a German immigrant and an Arkansas native. The 1910 census, which lists him working as a salesman in the “picture line” industry in his hometown of Greenville, Mississippi, reveals that he’d already been bitten by the photography bug at just 24 years old. Read more »

25, October 2016

Picturing 1930s St. Louis: An Introduction

Last month, the Missouri History Museum’s Photographs and Prints department began work on an exciting project involving the Sievers Studio Collection. The studio was founded in 1917 by professional commercial photographer Isaac Sievers. Over time, its staff expanded to include several photographers. Isaac’s son, Alvin, joined the business after World War II and kept it going until 1989. Throughout its 72 years of operation, the Sievers Studio captured 264 linear feet of negatives and prints—that’s the length of an entire city block! The Picturing 1930s St. Read more »

2, September 2016

Panoramic Perspectives: St. Louis by Sievers

If you’ve traveled through Terminal 2 at Lambert–St. Louis International Airport recently, you may have noticed that a little bit of the Missouri History Museum was there to welcome you home. Back in April, the Museum, in conjunction with Lambert Airport and the International Photography Hall of Fame, opened St. Read more »