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23, May 2017

How James B. Eads Conquered the Mighty Mississippi

The Mississippi River has beckoned millions of people to settle up and down its fertile banks, inspiring countless creative works. It has been personified in song, and its ever-changing nature has been used as a metaphor for life itself. But James Buchanan Eads didn’t find inspiration on the Mississippi’s surface—he found it below. Read more »

21, May 2017

Does the World Still Care about Charles Lindbergh?

On May 21, 1927, airmail pilot Charles Lindbergh became the first person to fly nonstop across the Atlantic Ocean. As he navigated the Spirit of St. Louis from New York to Paris, the world watched closely. When the plane touched down at Le Bourget Airport in Paris, a jubilant crowd greeted the aviator and created shockwaves of excitement that could be felt around the globe. Newspaper headlines lauded Lindbergh’s feat, throngs of people followed his every move, and various heads of state and dignitaries awarded him with medals of honor and extraordinary gifts. Read more »

17, May 2017

It Sure Is Good, Guys and Gals!

If you’re from this area or have lived here for some time, those words—the tagline for Ted Drewes Frozen Custard—instantly conjure thoughts of summer and the quintessential St. Louis frozen treat: a concrete you can turn upside down without spilling a drop. Read more »

8, May 2017

MHM Wins National Award for Diversity and Accessibility

Today we at the Missouri History Museum were honored to take the stage with our colleagues at The Field Museum in Chicago to accept the American Alliance of Museums’s (AAM) inaugural Award for Diversity, Equity, Accessibility, and Inclusion. Although we certainly don’t do our work with awards in mind, this one is pretty special. Read more »

27, April 2017

Have You Met an ACTivist Yet?

Whether introducing new generations to St. Louis's civil rights legacy or reminding older ones of its existence, the ACTivists Project ensures the people and stories of our community's freedom struggle will not be forgotten. This theatre-based project is a counterpart to our #1 in Civil Rights exhibit. Read more »

25, April 2017

How the Spanish-American War Met the Society Pages

It’s probably been a while since a St. Louis Post-Dispatch editor has penned several hundred exasperated words about the tango.

 
21, April 2017

Isaac Sievers: The Man Who'd Photograph Anything

Isaac Sievers—Sievers Studio founder and the man behind many of the photographs featured in our Picturing 1930s St. Louis project—was the son of a German immigrant and an Arkansas native. The 1910 census, which lists him working as a salesman in the “picture line” industry in his hometown of Greenville, Mississippi, reveals that he’d already been bitten by the photography bug at just 24 years old. Read more »

19, April 2017

Curator Faves: Clothing Edition

The Missouri History Museum has a wonderful clothing and textile collection, and I've had the honor of being responsible for it for almost 17 years. Because the collection is made of up more than 18,000 pieces, it’s hard to know every single thing within it, but by working on exhibits, writing articles, giving tours, and meeting with researchers, I learn more every day. To me the collection is like a treasure trove of two of my favorite things: history and fashion. I find something I’ve never seen before almost every time I go into storage, which keeps my job interesting. Read more »

6, April 2017

World War I: Missouri and the Great War

Today marks the centennial of America’s entry into World War I. Within months of the April 6, 1917, declaration of war, U.S. troops began arriving in France, factories across the nation started producing war material, and support began pouring in from the home front. Our newest exhibit, World War I: Missouri and the Great War, commemorates this significant portion of our collective history by exploring the wartime roles of Missourians and St. Louisans at home and overseas.  Read more »

15, March 2017

Unlocking a Treasure Trove of STL History

Last September, MHM’s Photos and Prints department began processing our Sievers Studio Collection, which contains the original negatives and select prints created by the Sievers Studio between 1918 and 1989. Thanks to funding provided by the NHPRC, we’re creating a detailed index describing each photo shoot and making some item-level records for the 1930s images. We've mainly been tackling the index up to now, and that work has helped us know how many and what kinds of images we have. Now we're starting to review the 3,600+ identified images from the indexed records to select some of the more interesting ones,  Read more »