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28, November 2017

5 Wacky Panoramas Details Hiding in Plain Sight

Thanks to their large widths, historic panoramic photos are able to cram lots of details into one space—often they aren’t even things the photographers meant to capture! They’re small snippets that live in the margins, details that, in the case of our Panoramas of the City exhibit, reveal the everyday lives of the people who called St. Louis home in the first half of the 20th century. Read more »

9, November 2017

A Chimney Topper's Tale

On February 16, 1959, the first buildings started to fall in St. Louis’s historic Mill Creek Valley neighborhood. Their demolition had been years in the making: In 1954, Mayor Raymond Tucker proposed a plan to raze the more than 400 square acres of city that stood between Saint Louis University and Union Station as part of St. Louis’s post–World War II revitalization. Read more »

22, October 2017

The Importance (And Challenges) of One Red Flyer

Panoramas of the City features some pretty breathtaking objects that immediately capture your attention as you make your way through the exhibit. There’s a stunning dress from a Veiled Prophet queen, a carefully restored 1927 Ford Model T Fordor Sedan, and a collection of some of the most eye-catching medals and awards won by Charles Lindbergh. Read more »

4, October 2017

Join the Crowd at the 1937 Veiled Prophet Ball

When our team was trying to decide which panoramas to enlarge for our Panoramas of the City exhibit, we knew they had to be visually striking and contain a wealth of historical information about St. Louis. One such image was a panorama shot at the 1937 Veiled Prophet Ball, which was held in the Municipal Auditorium downtown. Read more »

29, September 2017

An Autumn Day Unlike Any Other

Natural disasters have shaped the history of St. Louis from very early on. The Mississippi River and its many tributaries have swollen over their banks multiple times, violent earthquakes have shaken the region to its core, and fire and disease have swept through separately and simultaneously. Read more »

14, September 2017

Ebbie Tolbert and the Right to Vote

St. Louis changed forever in mid-September 1920 as thousands of women lined up at polling places all around the city to ensure they could finally make their voices heard on Election Day. Congress had formally ratified the 19th Amendment about a month prior, officially giving women the voting rights they had pushed for since 1848. Over the span of five days, more than 125,000 women registered, far exceeding local election officials’ predictions. One of those women was Ebbie Tolbert, an elderly African American who registered to vote in the city’s 7th Ward on September 14, 1920. Read more »

29, August 2017

A Panoramic Preview

Over the past several years, the Missouri History Museum has helped people experience different aspects of St. Louis history like never before. A Walk in 1875 St. Louis explored one amazing year in our city’s past, Route 66 revealed local history through a road that connected our region to the nation, and #1 in Civil Rights brought to light our city’s incredible contributions to the continued struggle for equality. Our newest exhibit, Panoramas of the City, continues this tradition. Read more »