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28, November 2017

5 Wacky Panoramas Details Hiding in Plain Sight

Thanks to their large widths, historic panoramic photos are able to cram lots of details into one space—often they aren’t even things the photographers meant to capture! They’re small snippets that live in the margins, details that, in the case of our Panoramas of the City exhibit, reveal the everyday lives of the people who called St. Louis home in the first half of the 20th century. Read more »

29, May 2017

Commemorating the Spirit of Sacrifice in War

Since it opened on Memorial Day 1938, Soldiers Memorial Military Museum has been—and continues to be—a place of remembrance. At its dedication as a World War I memorial two years earlier, President Franklin D. Roosevelt said: Read more »

6, April 2017

World War I: Missouri and the Great War

Today marks the centennial of America’s entry into World War I. Within months of the April 6, 1917, declaration of war, U.S. troops began arriving in France, factories across the nation started producing war material, and support began pouring in from the home front. Our newest exhibit, World War I: Missouri and the Great War, commemorates this significant portion of our collective history by exploring the wartime roles of Missourians and St. Louisans at home and overseas.  Read more »

21, March 2017

Mighty Military Women

Women have participated in nearly every major war in this country starting as far back as the Civil War, when hundreds of women disguised themselves as men to serve as secret soldiers, and others nursed the wounded. Read more »

11, November 2016

MIA But Not Forgotten

For those of us working at the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum, Veterans Day is incredibly important to recognize, because we’re constantly surrounded by artifacts that represent the stories of St. Louisans who served in the military, as well as their families. One of the St. Read more »

26, October 2016

A Soldier’s Story

When I joined the U.S. Air Force in September 1980 via the Delayed Entry Program, I immediately discovered that being homosexual in the military wasn’t allowed. The section of my enlistment form asking me to check whether I was homosexual made that pretty clear. In spite of this, I wanted to serve my country and travel the world. I also knew this would be the best experience for me to grow, to become something on my own. Read more »

3, August 2016

History in the Making: The Newest Cardinal Recruits

In addition to telling the stories of St. Louis and its military, veterans, and wartime past, Soldiers Memorial Military Museum serves as a place for our city's active-duty military and veterans to write their own stories through a wide range of activities, such as service projects, parades, meetings, and ceremonies. Although the building and Court of Honor are currently closed for construction, the Missouri Historical Society and the City of St. Read more »

24, June 2016

PrideFest's Wreath-Laying Origins

After retiring from the U.S. Air Force in 2007, I immediately got more involved with my local LGBT community in St. Louis, Missouri. I knew PrideFest happened each year, and I thought it would be a nice idea to get a group of LGBT veterans together and walk in the Pride Parade to celebrate our military service and LGBT identity, a testament to the fact that our nation’s miliary branches are made up of not only straight persons but gay persons as well. Read more »

9, June 2016

Revitalizing Soldiers: Processing the Collections

The Soldiers Memorial Military Museum’s collections are a time capsule. Encompassing thousands of donations dating back to Soldiers Memorial's opening in 1938, the collections were relatively untouched when my team and I began processing them in October 2014. In order to gain intellectual control over the collections (to know what we had and where it was), my team and I were tasked with inventorying every single item with the help of a digital database system—a first in Soldiers Memorial's nearly 80-year history. Read more »