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8, February 2017

Mapping Decline: St. Louis and the Fate of the American City

America’s cities are sources of controversy. Some people see them as places where the American dream has gone to die; others celebrate them as places where the American dream is alive and thriving.

How did communities that were once the sites of such promise—especially St. Louis—become ground zero for seemingly every major ongoing political conflict? Mapping Decline, a new traveling exhibit created by the Missouri History Museum and the Missouri Humanities Council, provides some much-needed historical perspective on this very question. Read more »

6, February 2017

Was Budweiser Really Born the Hard Way?

With the words “Welcome to St. Louis, son,” an exhausted, visionary immigrant joins the ranks of famous Anheuser-Busch Super Bowl commercials alongside croaking frogs, “Wassup” dudes, and Clydesdale-puppy friendships. The immigrant is Adolphus Busch himself, and the commercial is a minute-long mini-drama of what it takes to leave all behind and follow your dreams. Read more »

17, January 2017

A 10-Year-Old's Take

Recently my 5th-grade class took a field trip to the Missouri History Museum. We visited the exhibits TOYS of the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s and Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis. Read more »

2, December 2016

The Library and Research Center Is 25!

By the mid-1980s every available nook and cranny of the Jefferson Memorial Building (JMB) was occupied with some manner of collections storage, gallery, or office space. It was clear to the Missouri History Museum’s leadership that if the institution intended to keep acquiring artifacts for its collections that the only alternatives were to build an addition or find another location. Read more »

30, November 2016

Discovering the Early Days of a Painted Lady

I used to make my husband drive by our home—a Second Empire–style townhouse in Lafayette Square—before it was ours. He resisted touring the interior, but when I finally convinced him, we both left smitten. We were in love not just with its soaring ceilings, plaster cove moldings, and tidy pocket shutters but also with its wrinkles, bruises, and battle scars. There were wide, undulating baseboards that morphed suddenly into skinny runners. Read more »

12, November 2016

Naming Fred W. Stockham–St. Louis Post 4

Around Veterans Day, I’m always reminded of the long-running connections St. Louis has with veterans' organizations, specifically the American Legion. St. Louis played host to the first domestic caucus of the American Legion in 1919, and it was here that the organization adopted its constitution. Many American Legion posts are named in honor of individuals with connections to the Legion's founding members. One such post is Fred W. Stockham–St. Louis Post 4. Read more »

11, November 2016

MIA But Not Forgotten

For those of us working at the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum, Veterans Day is incredibly important to recognize, because we’re constantly surrounded by artifacts that represent the stories of St. Louisans who served in the military, as well as their families. One of the St. Read more »

7, November 2016

Broadening Teens' Horizons: TMH Academy

Your challenge, should you choose to accept it? Design and create a pop-up exhibit that includes and connects the special objects your team members have brought from home. Read more »

4, November 2016

About That 1926 Willys

The day began like so many others for Mr. and Mrs. Willys. They were out on a drive through the rolling countryside when they came across a man standing in the middle of the road, motioning for them to stop. When they did, the man told them he needed to detain them for just a few minutes while a tow truck backed into the lot ahead. It was preparing to move an old vehicle buried beneath the brush in the field. Read more »

1, November 2016

No Trivial Pursuit: St. Louis's Obsession with Trivia Nights

QUESTION 1: In 1999, which Cardinal became the only player in Major League Baseball history to hit two grand slams in the same inning? (Answer at the end of this post.)

Americans have played trivia games for decades. The popularity of TV’s Jeopardy! and the board game Trivial Pursuit are testaments to our collective fascination with facts and love of a good-old-fashioned competition. Pub trivia over a couple pitchers of beer is arguably more popular than darts these days—perhaps because there's no physical mastery required! Read more »