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7, December 2017

Unveiling the Veiled Prophet

ACTION—a nonviolent, direct-action protest organization made entirely of interracial volunteer members—began protesting the white-only Veiled Prophet (VP) organization in 1967. These demonstrations were part of a strategy to enhance ACTION’s ongoing protest for fair employment—ACTION members did not protest the VP so they could be part of it. In fact, ACTION viewed the VP as a racist organization and advocated that it should be abolished so St. Louis could begin freeing itself from institutional racism and become a prosperous city for all.  Read more »

15, November 2017

Of Primary (Source) Importance

Distilling 200+ years of civil rights history into a 76-page book provides an immediate recipe for writer’s agony—and that’s before the wrinkle of crafting text for an upper elementary school audience. Yet that’s the task Dr. Melanie Adams and I faced in researching and producing Standing Up For Civil Rights in St. Louis, a young reader’s companion to the #1 in Civil Rights exhibit currently on view at the Missouri History Museum. Read more »

19, September 2017

How Our ACTivists Bring History to Life

#1 in Civil Rights: The African American Freedom Struggle in St. Louis has introduced a new feature to exhibits at the Missouri History Museum: live performances by four actor-interpreters, or as we like to call them, our intrepid ACTivists. Read more »

26, August 2017

Jefferson Bank: A Defining Moment

The protests against unequal hiring practices at Jefferson Bank and Trust, which lasted for seven months, mark the largest—and most contentious—civil rights struggle in the history of St. Louis. Many local civil rights activists were involved, including William “Bill” Clay, Ivory Perry, Norman Seay, Charles and Marian Oldham, and Robert Curtis. Read more »