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27, September 2017

A Puppy and a Pair of Pistols

America’s most famous duel, between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr in 1804, shares some interesting parallels with what occurred just 13 years later on an unassuming sandbar island in the Mississippi River. Both incidents involved an argumentative, ambitious lawyer and a more reserved lawyer from a well-to-do family, but in the local duel the participant with the fiery temper won—though it took him two tries to manage it. Read more »

14, September 2017

Ebbie Tolbert and the Right to Vote

St. Louis changed forever in mid-September 1920 as thousands of women lined up at polling places all around the city to ensure they could finally make their voices heard on Election Day. Congress had formally ratified the 19th Amendment about a month prior, officially giving women the voting rights they had pushed for since 1848. Over the span of five days, more than 125,000 women registered, far exceeding local election officials’ predictions. One of those women was Ebbie Tolbert, an elderly African American who registered to vote in the city’s 7th Ward on September 14, 1920. Read more »

29, August 2017

A Panoramic Preview

Over the past several years, the Missouri History Museum has helped people experience different aspects of St. Louis history like never before. A Walk in 1875 St. Louis explored one amazing year in our city’s past, Read more »

27, August 2017

The St. Louis Epidemic That Wasn't

Major Walter Reed, a surgeon in the U.S. Army at the turn of the 20th century, is typically given credit for proving the connection between mosquitoes and yellow fever. But what if he wasn’t the first person to observe the link between the two? Read more »

22, August 2017

The Great Divorce

Throughout the 1860s the entire 588-square-mile area that now makes up St. Louis County and St. Louis City was ruled as one by the St. Louis County Court. Back then more than 300,000 people occupied the land east of Grand Avenue (the city’s boundary at the time), while the vast space beyond was home to barely 31,000 people. Older towns such as Florissant and small train stops such as Kirkwood and Ferguson sat in a sea of undeveloped land and farm fields. Read more »

18, August 2017

Meriwether Lewis in St. Louis

Though his time in our river town was short, Meriwether Lewis’s efforts as a trailblazer and founding father of the Louisiana Territory ensure he’ll forever be associated with St. Louis. Read more »

16, August 2017

Racial Tensions in St. Louis Waiters' Unions

If you went out to dinner in St. Louis during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, odds are your waiter would have been an African American male. At the time, the majority of waiters were black, and the position was seen as one of the most desirable ones available to black workers due to its relatively substantial wage and lack of physical labor. The security African Americans felt in this role was short-lived though, because in the 1910s white men saw the same benefits of waiting tables and attempted to force black men out of the industry. Read more »

1, August 2017

6 More Memorable STL Sports Moments

St. Louis is a sports town, no doubt. Local teams and hometown heroes have provided countless action-packed, exhilarating, frustrating, and heartrending moments for fans near and far over the years, but some of those moments stand out even more than others. Here's just a handful of 'em, in no particular order. (Check out our first list here.) Read more »

26, July 2017

St. Louis in the Great Depression

When the stock market crashed in 1929, St. Louis was among the largest cities in the country. With a population of more than 820,000 people, it ranked seventh overall, right between Cleveland and Baltimore. As a result, the early years of the Great Depression hit St. Louis hard. Read more »

18, July 2017

Rico Zouave: How Clothes Helped Make One Man

Each year clothing designers spend millions to convince us that the right outfit can change our lives. For a Chicago man inspired by the uniforms and skills of North Africa's Zouave (rhymes with suave) soldiers, that turned out to be true. It also left an imprint on St. Louis and changed Civil War history. Read more »