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12, December 2017

An Art Deco Jewel in Forest Park

When artwork showing the proposed design for the “new” Jewel Box appeared in St. Louis newspapers, some residents were less than impressed. One anonymous reader wrote a prickly letter to the editor calling it “simply grotesque” and “not suitable for any public building that is to stand for generations.” Read more »

1, December 2017

William Carr Lane: St. Louis's First Mayor

William Carr Lane had a restless nature, floating from academic studies, to work, to militia fighting, to medicine. Eventually, President James Madison appointed him as “garrison surgeon’s mate” at Fort Belle Fontaine, north of St. Louis. Lane served there until 1819, when he settled in St. Louis. By this time, Lane was nearly 30, and although he maintained a continuous medical practice and served as chairman of the Department of Obstetrics at Kemper College, he began to turn more of his attention toward public office. Read more »

1, November 2017

What Survivors Had to Say

In 1855 the Pacific Railroad was completed from St. Louis to Jefferson City, an achievement four years in the making. To celebrate the railroad’s progress, 600 special guests were invited to take a train ride to the Missouri capital. On November 1, 1855, St. Louis officials and dignitaries boarded train cars and settled in for the journey, confident of their safe arrival despite stormy weather. Read more »

24, October 2017

Let's Go to the Movies!

The Picturing 1930s St. Louis: Sievers Studio Collection Project is made possible by an NHPRC grant from the National Archives. Read more »

4, October 2017

Join the Crowd at the 1937 Veiled Prophet Ball

When our team was trying to decide which panoramas to enlarge for our Panoramas of the City exhibit, we knew they had to be visually striking and contain a wealth of historical information about St. Louis. One such image was a panorama shot at the 1937 Veiled Prophet Ball, which was held in the Municipal Auditorium downtown. Read more »

29, September 2017

An Autumn Day Unlike Any Other

Natural disasters have shaped the history of St. Louis from very early on. The Mississippi River and its many tributaries have swollen over their banks multiple times, violent earthquakes have shaken the region to its core, and fire and disease have swept through separately and simultaneously. Read more »

27, September 2017

A Puppy and a Pair of Pistols

America’s most famous duel, between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr in 1804, shares some interesting parallels with what occurred just 13 years later on an unassuming sandbar island in the Mississippi River. Both incidents involved an argumentative, ambitious lawyer and a more reserved lawyer from a well-to-do family, but in the local duel the participant with the fiery temper won—though it took him two tries to manage it. Read more »

21, September 2017

Exercising the Mind, Body, and Spirit

In 1848 revolutions demanding national unity, democracy, and freedom from censorship engulfed the German Confederation (a collection of 39 loosely linked states that eventually birthed modern Germany). The revolutions failed, and thousands of working-class and intellectual Germans fled to the United States. New German faces arrived on the St. Louis riverfront daily as a result. Most had little with them except the desire to carry on a familiar social tradition, one that became a cornerstone of German St. Louis. Read more »

14, September 2017

Ebbie Tolbert and the Right to Vote

St. Louis changed forever in mid-September 1920 as thousands of women lined up at polling places all around the city to ensure they could finally make their voices heard on Election Day. Congress had formally ratified the 19th Amendment about a month prior, officially giving women the voting rights they had pushed for since 1848. Over the span of five days, more than 125,000 women registered, far exceeding local election officials’ predictions. One of those women was Ebbie Tolbert, an elderly African American who registered to vote in the city’s 7th Ward on September 14, 1920. Read more »

29, August 2017

A Panoramic Preview

Over the past several years, the Missouri History Museum has helped people experience different aspects of St. Louis history like never before. A Walk in 1875 St. Louis explored one amazing year in our city’s past, Route 66 revealed local history through a road that connected our region to the nation, and #1 in Civil Rights brought to light our city’s incredible contributions to the continued struggle for equality. Our newest exhibit, Panoramas of the City, continues this tradition. Read more »