Archive | St. Louis historyRSS feed for this section

28, April 2017

The First Police Rogues' Gallery in America

Would you believe that photography became a crime-fighting tool fairly early in its existence, at a time when some viewed the technology as utterly unbelievable and others had never even heard of it? What if someone told you that this law-enforcement innovation developed right here in St. Louis? Read more »

21, April 2017

Isaac Sievers: The Man Who'd Photograph Anything

Isaac Sievers—Sievers Studio founder and the man behind many of the photographs featured in our Picturing 1930s St. Louis project—was the son of a German immigrant and an Arkansas native. The 1910 census, which lists him working as a salesman in the “picture line” industry in his hometown of Greenville, Mississippi, reveals that he’d already been bitten by the photography bug at just 24 years old. Read more »

13, April 2017

Jordan Chambers: The Negro Mayor of St. Louis

In 1931 the St. Louis Post-Dispatch referred to Jordan Chambers, who held no official political office, as the Negro Mayor of St. Louis. Chambers was larger than life, a political power broker whose influence was far reaching. It was said that little happened in St. Louis politics—or in the black community in general—that Chambers didn’t somehow have a hand in. Read more »

10, April 2017

66 Through St. Louis: Crestwood Bowl

This is the seventh in a series of posts highlighting Route 66 stops of interest through St. Louis. We encourage you to learn more about their history and then check them out in person. Even better, snap some photos and share them with us on Twitter and Instagram by using #ShowMe66 and tagging @mohistorymuseum.  Read more »

4, April 2017

The Most Disgraceful Election in American Politics

One of the beautiful things about the Missouri History Museum’s Library (aside from the setting, of course), is that sometimes you can come across some pretty cool stuff by accident. While working on a long-term project of inventorying and rehousing single-issue newspapers from our collections, we recently stumbled onto some amazing headlines from the front page of The St. Louis Chronicle concerning St. Louis’s mayoral race in 1901. Read more »

30, March 2017

A Fate of Flames

St. Louis was once home to one of the largest hotels in all the world—until the unthinkable happened. Read more »

24, March 2017

Meet the Potters

St. Louis has a long tradition of cultivating both artists and avenues for delivering their work to receptive audiences. River Styx magazine, for one, has been a vessel for poetry, art, fiction, and nonfiction since 1975, presenting work from Pulitzer Prize winners, poets laureate, and novices alike. Read more »

17, March 2017

How the Irish Found Gold in St. Louis

Unlike the experiences of Irish immigrants in nearly every other major U.S. city, the Irish who settled in St. Louis in the mid-1800s were embraced—and they thrived. The following is adapted from Rev. William Barnaby Faherty’s 2001 book The St. Louis Irish: An Unmatched Celtic Community, published by the Missouri Historical Society Press. Read more »

1, March 2017

66 Through St. Louis: Motel Row

This is the sixth in a series of posts highlighting Route 66 stops of interest through St. Louis. We encourage you to learn more about their history and then check them out in person. Even better, snap some photos and share them with us on Twitter and Instagram by using #ShowMe66 and tagging @mohistorymuseum. 

When it came to getting sleep along Route 66, motel owners often managed precious little because they were too busy competing to convince travelers that they alone offered the best night’s rest. Read more »

20, February 2017

Breaking News: President Kennedy's Assassination

Last October, I received a letter from retired newspaper reporter Ted Pollard. In it he offered to donate a document related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Although he lives in Ohio now, for about six months in 1963 Pollard worked on the business desk of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat. Each day he watched the incoming tapes of the noontime quotes from the Dow Jones business-wire machine, which sat next to the main, broad-tape teletype device that carried major news stories from the Associated Press (AP). Read more »