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6, April 2017

World War I: Missouri and the Great War

Today marks the centennial of America’s entry into World War I. Within months of the April 6, 1917, declaration of war, U.S. troops began arriving in France, factories across the nation started producing war material, and support began pouring in from the home front. Our newest exhibit, World War I: Missouri and the Great War, commemorates this significant portion of our collective history by exploring the wartime roles of Missourians and St. Louisans at home and overseas.  Read more »

21, March 2017

Mighty Military Women

Women have participated in nearly every major war in this country starting as far back as the Civil War, when hundreds of women disguised themselves as men to serve as secret soldiers, and others nursed the wounded. Read more »

12, November 2016

Naming Fred W. Stockham–St. Louis Post 4

Around Veterans Day, I’m always reminded of the long-running connections St. Louis has with veterans' organizations, specifically the American Legion. St. Louis played host to the first domestic caucus of the American Legion in 1919, and it was here that the organization adopted its constitution. Many American Legion posts are named in honor of individuals with connections to the Legion's founding members. One such post is Fred W. Stockham–St. Louis Post 4. Read more »

29, July 2016

Leading the Way in War Work

Several women's organizations in St. Louis played pivotal roles in leading war-work efforts on the home front during World War I. Without these groups' backing, troops connected to the St. Louis region may not have retained the strength and morale needed to achieve success in the war. Read more »

5, July 2016

Eye on Exhibits: I Hated It

“I hated that exhibit. It gave such an ugly view of our city. I hate for people from out of town to see it.”

“We didn’t really care for that one. It was just a lot of stuff on the walls to read.” Read more »

27, April 2016

Anti-German Sentiment Hits Home

The threat of terror feels like something so unique to the present day that, sometimes, we forget how it has shaped our city and our country throughout history. One of the clearest examples of the ways the threat of terror shaped St. Louis happened about a century ago. Read more »

9, November 2015

WWI Artifacts and Memories: Mother Goose in Wartime

Perhaps one of the more unique World War I artifacts in the Museum’s collection is a small booklet in the Library and Research Center titled Mother Goose in Wartime. The collection of wartime-themed nursery rhymes was illustrated by Gladys M. Wheat (the first female faculty member of the University of Missouri’s art department) and other University of Missouri art students. The content was written by George F. Nardin, also of the University of Missouri. Read more »

23, February 2015

WWI Artifacts and Memories—From the Mexican Border to Northern France

For many Missourians military service did not start with World War I. Rather, it began on the Mexican border after the Mexican Revolution in 1910. American soldiers stationed on the Mexican border would clash with Mexican rebels over several years, culminating in the 1916 Punitive Expedition, during which General John J. Pershing pursued Pancho Villa into Mexico. The events on the Mexican border resulted in the mobilization of National Guard regiments across the country, including the Missouri National Guard. Read more »

6, February 2015

WWI Artifacts and Memories—Over There: Missouri and the Great War

Since 2012 the Missouri History Museum has hosted associate historian Rochelle Caruthers at the Museum’s Library and Research Center. As a part of the Over There: Missouri and the Great War digitization project team, Rochelle has surveyed, scanned, and transcribed selected World War I collections at MHM and in the greater St. Louis region. Rochelle has counterparts across the state who have scanned and transcribed thousands of pages since the beginning of the project. Read more »

10, November 2014

Wartime Sweethearts

In September 1917, plumber Frank Clinton Mitchell found himself at Camp Pike, an army training camp in Little Rock, Arkansas. Working a construction job in support of the war, he was not only separated from his native St. Louis, but also from his sweetheart, Edna Kessler. Read more »