Advertisement for MHM's "#1 in Civil Rights" exhibit
Past St. Louis Cardinals baseball players
Pageant and Masque crew and assorted costumed cast members with Art Hill in the distance, 1914.
22, August 2017

The Great Divorce

Throughout the 1860s the entire 588-square-mile area that now makes up St. Louis County and St. Louis City was ruled as one by the St. Louis County Court. Back then more than 300,000 people occupied the land east of Grand Avenue (the city’s boundary at the time), while the vast space beyond was home to barely 31,000 people. Older towns such as Florissant and small train stops such as Kirkwood and Ferguson sat in a sea of undeveloped land and farm fields. Read more »

18, August 2017

Meriwether Lewis in St. Louis

Though his time in our river town was short, Meriwether Lewis’s efforts as a trailblazer and founding father of the Louisiana Territory ensure he’ll forever be associated with St. Louis. Read more »

16, August 2017

Racial Tensions in St. Louis Waiters' Unions

If you went out to dinner in St. Louis during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, odds are your waiter would have been an African American male. At the time, the majority of waiters were black, and the position was seen as one of the most desirable ones available to black workers due to its relatively substantial wage and lack of physical labor. The security African Americans felt in this role was short lived though, because in the 1910s white men saw the same benefits of waiting tables and attempted to force black men out of the industry. Read more »

14, August 2017

History in the Heavens

It’s a rare day I’d say this, but on the early afternoon of August 21, I really hope you’re NOT inside the Missouri History Museum. In fact, I hope you’re not even in Forest Park! If you are, you’ll miss the history happening outside. Read more »

8, August 2017

Reaching Beyond Our Walls

Here at the Missouri History Museum we’re committed to connecting all St. Louisans with our shared history. That includes those who face barriers to visiting us, like the youth at the St. Louis County Juvenile Detention Center. Read more »

5, August 2017

The Missouri National Guard Prepares for War

When the United States entered World War I, it had a standing army of fewer than 130,000 troops, with an additional 70,000 troops in the reserves. To put that in perspective, at the start of the war in 1914, Germany had a combined standing army and reserve force of 4.5 million. Read more »

1, August 2017

6 More Memorable STL Sports Moments

St. Louis is a sports town, no doubt. Local teams and hometown heroes have provided countless action-packed, exhilarating, frustrating, and heartrending moments for fans near and far over the years, but some of those moments stand out even more than others. Here's just a handful of 'em, in no particular order. (Check out our first list here.) Read more »

26, July 2017

St. Louis in the Great Depression

When the stock market crashed in 1929, St. Louis was among the largest cities in the country. With a population of more than 820,000 people, it ranked seventh overall, right between Cleveland and Baltimore. As a result, the early years of the Great Depression hit St. Louis hard. Read more »

24, July 2017

Ain’t No Party Like a Henry Shaw Party

There ain’t no party like a Henry Shaw party ’cause a Henry Shaw party . . . didn’t have an official start time. Friends just showed up at his door. Read more »

20, July 2017

From Amicable Meetings to Brutal Beatings: The 1972 City Jail Sit-In

The evening of July 11, 1972, was typical of a St. Louis summer—until 30 riot squad policemen armed with tear gas, clubs, and dogs stormed the chapel on the sixth floor of the St. Louis City Jail to break up a three-day protest against cold food, lack of hygiene supplies, poor recreation facilities, and inadequate medical care. Read more »