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Past St. Louis Cardinals baseball players
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14, June 2016

4 Boss Suffragettes of Missouri History

Welcome to the Suffragette Edition of our look at the boss women of Missouri history. We’re recognizing these four women today in honor of the centennial of the Golden Lane, when nearly 2,000 suffragettes donned yellow sashes, busted out their yellow parasols, and lined St. Louis's Locust Street for miles. This visible call for women’s voting rights occurred during the 1916 Democratic Convention. Read more »

13, June 2016

A Hamilton Revelation

Confession time? Here’s what I got: I’ve always loved and been fascinated by history, but I tend to be drawn more to European and ancient Egyptian history than American history. There’s just more of it to appreciate and try to understand. Read more »

9, June 2016

Revitalizing Soldiers: Processing the Collections

The Soldiers Memorial Military Museum’s collections are a time capsule. Encompassing thousands of donations dating back to Soldiers Memorial's opening in 1938, the collections were relatively untouched when my team and I began processing them in October 2014. In order to gain intellectual control over the collections (to know what we had and where it was), my team and I were tasked with inventorying every single item with the help of a digital database system—a first in Soldiers Memorial's nearly 80-year history. Read more »

6, June 2016

Go South to Sunny Germany

The collection of the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum is as vast as it is interesting, encompassing the breadth of U.S. military history from the War of 1812 to the current armed forces. Part of my role as military and arms curator, is to identify interesting stories and artifacts from the collection for the new exhibits being created as part of the Museum’s revitalization. This process has led to many great discoveries. Read more »

3, June 2016

More Than Just Black Paper

Although the focus of Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night is on the dresses and the way the color black has evolved in women’s fashion over the years, the exhibit also highlights Victorian-era expressions of grief that went beyond clothing, such as mourning stationery. Read more »

27, May 2016

Looking Back: The Great Cyclone of 1896

Shortly after 5pm on Wednesday, May 27, 1896, one of the largest tornadoes in American history swept through St. Louis, wreaking havoc on the city and neighboring East St. Louis. More than 250 people were killed in just 20 minutes. This tragic incident remains one of the most costly and devastating natural disasters in American history. Click through the gallery below to relive the aftermath of that fateful day through images from our collection.  Read more »

25, May 2016

Looking Back: The St. Louis Arena

Today the St. Louis Blues call downtown's Scottrade Center home, but many of you likely have fond memories of their former home—the St. Louis Arena. Opened in 1929 in St. Louis's Dogtown neighborhood, the Arena was known as the Checkerdome from 1977 to 1983 after the building and the team were purchased by Ralston Purina. The iconic St. Louis building was demolished after the Blues moved to their new home, the Kiel Center (now the Scottrade Center), in 1994. Click through the gallery below to see the Arena's story through images and artifacts from our collection. Read more »

19, May 2016

Craft Beer: Nothing New for the Lou!

Last year, in a pair of posts written for my personal blog (Distilled History), I detailed a crazy plan of mine to identify every single Read more »

16, May 2016

Rock On with the Teen Tones

In the middle of the 1950s, rock ’n’ roll was freshly sweeping the nation. It was so new that it hadn’t even caught on with St. Louis musicians—until a group of Affton High School students formed the Teen Tones, also known as Jules Blattner and the Teen Tones.  Read more »

11, May 2016

Tennessee in St. Louis

“What shouldn’t you do if you’re a young playwright? Don’t bore the audience! I mean, even if you have to resort to totally arbitrary killing on stage, or pointless gunfire, at least it’ll catch their attention and keep them awake. Just keep the thing going any way you can.”
—Tennesee Williams in an interview with Dotson Rader for The Paris Review, 1981 Read more »